When Weather Doesn’t Cooperate: Attempt on Hiuchi-yama (火打山) and Myoko-san (妙高山).

Kurosawadake

Climbing partner J and I have already delayed our trip one week due to heavy rain, and now it’s June 27 and we’ve decided to take our chances on the oscillating weather forecast.  We load our packs into J’s Honda and hit the road for Niigata, where we hope to summit Hiuchi-yama today and Myoko-san tomorrow, before returning tomorrow afternoon.  Traffic is light at 5:30 a.m., and aside from one 15-minute detour courtesy of our GPS unit, the trip is largely smooth.  As we near the trailhead at Sasagamine, we drive past a family of monkeys moving through the roadside trees; they’ve attracted a dozen cars, all parked along the two-lane road, eager to photograph them.

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La Sportiva FC ECO 2.0 GTX Hiking Shoe Review

When your job moves you around the world every few years, you get pretty good at organizing a house-full of stuff to be packed, shipped and unpacked at its destination.  In the fifteen or so years my wife and I have been living this life, we’ve had a remarkably strong track record of getting the things we want and need to our new home.  There is luck involved, too; one hears tales of cargo ships sinking, condemning all of a family’s possessions to The Deep.  To make a long story short, we’re pretty good at this.

Then, imagine my displeasure when, after searching the last few not-fully-unpacked boxes we brought with us to Japan, I discovered that my trusty old pair of Asolo backpacking boots were nowhere to be found.  Now, they’re not lost and gone forever; I used them a few times during our last stint back in the States, so they doubtless sit safely packed into one of our boxes in long-term storage.

A well-used pair of the La Sportiva FC ECO 2.0 GTX.  The prominent toe cap detracts from the shoe's usability in more formal occasions, but adds protection on the trail.
A well-used pair of the La Sportiva FC ECO 2.0 GTX. The prominent toe cap detracts from the shoe’s usability in more formal occasions, but adds protection on the trail.

So, when I decided to get back into hiking again after a hiatus, I spent some time online researching boots.  But a number of sites, especially those preaching the lightweight and ultralightweight backpacking gospel, said boots were passé, that they didn’t really give support to one’s ankles anyway, and that shoes were the In Thing.  I was skeptical, but as I read more, I found that even more mainstream sites were encouraging hikers to consider a low-cut shoe for hiking and light backpacking.  Part of the rationale stems from a study by the U.S. Army that finds that among the soldiers studied, “Weight alone appeared to account for 48-70% of the added energy cost of wearing boots.”  And that science is backed up by a considerable amount of anecdotal reporting from hikers who have made the switch.  So I thought I would give it a try.

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Akadake 赤岳 and Yatsugatake 八ヶ岳 (Chino 茅野 to Kiyosato 清里 traverse)

Below treeline, with one of Yatsugatake's peaks towering above.
Below treeline, with one of Yatsugatake’s peaks towering above.

Note: The events of this post took place June 21-22, 2014.

Friend-and-coworker J and I set out for Shinjuku Station to catch the 8:00 am JR Chuo Line Limited Express Super Azusa 5 train bound for Nagano Prefecture.  With 36 platforms and 200 exits, we eventually make our way to the waiting train, only to learn that we cannot purchase reserve seats at the platform, so standing it is until enough commuters deboard and unreserved seats open 100 minutes into the two-hours-and-change trip.

Hefting our packs and trekking poles, we move quickly out of Chino Station, scanning a building across the street for where our guidebook tells us the bus stops.  The bus only runs a few times a day, and missing this one will keep us here for long enough to make sure we won’t reach our goal before nightfall.

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